Traffic Signal Improvements on Mayfield Road in Cleveland Heights

On September 13, 2013, the NOACA Board of Directors approved the following regarding this project: Resolution No. 2013-029 Project Planning Review and Resolution No. 2013-030 Plan and TIP Amendment. The project Planning Review (PPR) and Intergovernmental Review and Consultation (IGRC) processes for this project are now complete.

Title: Traffic Signal Improvements on Mayfield Road in Cleveland Heights
Sponsor: City of Cleveland Heights
Name: CUY MAYFIELD RD SIGNALS
Estimated Total Cost: $3,715,000 (preliminary engineering, right-of-way and construction)
Proposed Source of Federal Funds: NOACA

History/Background: In October 2012, a traffic signal warrant study along Mayfield Road (US-322), within the Cleveland Heights corporate limits, was prepared at the request of the City of Cleveland Heights. The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of 15 existing signalized intersections along Mayfield Road to determine whether they met traffic signal warrant requirements. Based on the traffic signal warrant study, traffic signals are warranted at eleven (11) of the fifteen (15) existing signalized intersections based on the current traffic volumes. Four (4) existing traffic signal locations did not satisfy traffic volume based warrants. The sponsor reports that these locations should be studied further (as noted in the warrant study document) to determine if they are warranted based upon the actual peak hour delay of the side street. This would be completed by performing a delay study at these intersections. If these signal locations do not satisfy a signal warrant which is ultimately approved by ODOT, then these locations would not be eligible for federal funds.

On December 3, 2012, the City of Cleveland Heights passed Resolution No. 171-2012 authorizing the City Manager to apply for Federal Surface Transportation Program and/or Congestion Mitigation/Air Quality funds programmed by NOACA to upgrade the Mayfield Road Traffic Signal System.

Current Conditions: Mayfield Road is functionally classified as urban principal arterial. The average daily traffic (ADT) of 21,490 vehicles per day (NOACA Cuyahoga County Highway Traffic Counts, published 2009). The sponsor reports that Mayfield Road is a significant east/west connector on the east side of the greater Cleveland area. Mayfield Road connects the eastern suburbs of Cleveland Heights and I-271 directly with University Circle. The sponsor reports that the current traffic signal installations along Mayfield Road are antiquated and in need of replacement. The equipment has been maintained through its lifetime, but, due to the age of the equipment, it has become difficult to maintain the operation of the traffic control system in the manner desired. Due to the poor operation of the traffic signal system, travel speeds along the corridor are low and the signals are no longer coordinated signals. Additionally, the current pedestrian ways along the corridor are not ADA (Americans with Disabilities) compliant.

Proposed Project: The proposed project will involve replacing (as warranted) approximately 15 traffic signals at intersections along Mayfield Road, in the city of Cleveland Heights (location map). The sponsor reports that the proposed project would update the traffic signal system to improve the operation of the traffic signal system along the Mayfield Road corridor to decrease intersection delay and improve overall traffic progression along the corridor. The replacement system would consist of new traffic signal installations (mast arm supports) with new LED (light emitting diode) signal heads to reduce energy costs. New pedestrian signals with countdown indications would be provided in order to ensure ADA compliance. Additionally, new traffic vehicle detection will be provided with this new traffic signal system. As part of this project, the sponsor will install either video detector or thermal detection equipment in order to save future costs associated with inductive loop failures due to age or road resurfacing. New traffic signal controllers would be provided. The traffic signals would be interconnected into a closed loop traffic signal system which would be programmed to operate in traffic responsive mode. This operation varies the traffic signal timing patterns and splits based upon the actual amount of traffic measured traveling through the system. By providing this type of operation, travel times would be reduced and average travel speeds would increase, thereby reducing congestion and improving air quality by reducing idle time along the corridor. The sponsor also states that new curb ramps and pedestrian signal equipment would be installed along the corridor at locations where they are required to bring the intersections into ADA compliance, as current ramps and pedestrian push button spacings do not meet current ADA criteria.

The estimated total project cost, provided by the sponsor, is $3,715,000. The estimated cost of preliminary engineering preliminary development (PEPD) is $49,152. The estimated cost of preliminary engineering detail design (PEDD) is $246,548. The estimated cost for right-of-way (RW) is $40,000. The PEPD, PEDD and RW will be funded locally. The estimated cost for construction is $3,379,300. The sponsor requests 80 percent ($2,703,440) of the construction cost be funded with CMAQ funds. The sponsor will provide the 20 percent local match ($675,860).

Staff Comment (Summary):

Short Range Planning: Project Development and Member Services Team

  • This project is consistent with NOACA’s Connections+ 2035 Goal #3 (Preserve and Improve the Efficiency of the Transportation System).
  • Eligibility for CMAQ funding will require an analysis from the sponsor demonstrating pollutant emission reduction as a result of the project.
  • The request for CMAQ funds will need to be processed consistent with Governing Board policy that was approved on April 13, 2007.
  • The total number of crashes for the period of 2009 – 2011 is 447 (mostly rear-ends). There was one fatal crash, eight pedestrian crashes and nine pedal-cycle crashes. The crash rate is 7.84 crashes/MVM (million vehicle miles). Based on the crash data and on a detailed study of the contributing factors for those crashes, the project should include all related safety countermeasures to improve the safety of all road users.
  • The sponsor should review the cost estimate of each phase at significant review stages of project design development. The estimated cost of construction of $3,379,000 for 15 intersections is high when comparing it to recently sold signal projects in Brunswick (June 2012) and Solon (May 2013). As noted in the warrant study document, four traffic signal locations did not satisfy traffic volume based warrants. The sponsor reports that these locations will be studied further to determine if they are warranted based upon the actual peak hour delay of the side street. If these signal locations do not satisfy a signal warrant which is ultimately approved by ODOT, then these locations would not be eligible for federal funds.
  • Video detection is included as part of this project, which is capable of turn movement traffic counts. NOACA requests the city to provide traffic counts on major intersections on a yearly basis.
  • The sponsor will be required to document that this project conforms with regional Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) architecture.
  • The sponsor should include accommodation for the blind and visually impaired (e.g. sound actuated signals).
  • The signal timing and emergency vehicle pre-emption should be coordinated with neighboring communities.
  • Recommend committee and public review in order to obtain comments.

Intergovernmental Review and Consultation (IGRC):

If you are a representative of a governmental entity and would like to comment on this project, please email us.

ODOT District 12:

  • Also provide backplates to new traffic signals to comply with the OMUTCD
  • District reminds sponsor that the new system should be operated and maintained by a qualified person to obtain long term investment goals
  • Refer to 2005 ODOT Safety Study for the countermeasures identified by the NOACA staff
  • ODOT District 12 concurs with NOACA staff that the estimate seems high and should be reviewed and revised if necessary 
  •  District suggests considering countdown timers on pedestrian signal heads.

    Public Involvement:

    NOACA encourages comments from the public on this proposed transportation improvement project. We would appreciate it if you include your city of residence, although it is not required. The public review period lasts until the Governing Board makes a decision about them.

Committee Review

Regional Transportation Investment Subcommittee (RTIS) /Transportation Subcommittee: 

This project is consistent with NOACA’s Connections+ 2035 Goal #3 (Preserve and Improve the Efficiency of the Transportation System).

Last updated: 10/23/2013 1:37:19 PM